Hits and misses

As you probably know, one of my goals is to become a freelancer and spend my days writing for magazines and newspapers. Now I realise it’s going to take a while to get there, and for the most part I’m content to work at it slowly and “pay my dues”, so to speak.

But there are times when I want to be freelancing NOW, if not sooner.

This afternoon was one of those times: doing a 10-minute walk up a hill to get to the train station, rain belting down despite the fact it was still close to 30 degrees (“Brisbane, Australia: Nature’s sauna”).

And all I could thing was, “I won’t miss this one little bit”.

As I squeezed onto the train and grabbed one of the stirrups, I thought about the other things I wouldn’t miss when I’m a freelancer. And you know what? There’s quite a few of them.

For a start, I won’t miss catching trains during peak-hour. I’d love to say I’ll never catch one again once I’m freelancing, but I may have to for research (“Ten diseases the person sitting next to you might have”). Still, I should be able to choose a time when I won’t risk cracking a rib trying to get on.

I won’t miss the mad rush to get our son to day care in the morning. We’ll still have to take him (my typing can only entertain him for so long), but at least there won’t be a mad rush to get him there early enough so I can get a park at the train station because if all the car spaces are taken where on earth would I park and OMG I don’t know what to do!

I won’t miss going to hour-long meetings where there’s no agenda and even less interest.

I won’t miss having to record how I spend my day—which project I was working on, how many hours I spent on it, how many times I burped, etc. (It will also be nice to be my own boss, instead of having the four I do now.)

I won’t miss being called away to fix someone’s computer problem the moment I sit down at my desk with my lunch/coffee/book. Oh, and a special message to whoever rigged my chair to let everyone know the moment I sit down: I hate you.

And finally I won’t miss my mind being numbed so badly by the nine-to-five job that it takes me until eleven o’clock at night to think of what I’m going to blog about.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to get some sleep. Something I definitely do miss.

{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Jen January 30, 2010, 1:09 am

    I often feel the same, but today I was reminded of something I will miss. The occasional Friday afternoon (unfortunately it’s VERY occasional… maybe four times a year) when we decide enough’s enough around 3:30 or 4pm, raid our Director’s fridge and talk crap over a beer before starting the weekend. 🙂

    Reply
    • Bill Harper January 30, 2010, 10:30 pm

      That sounds like a great way to wrap up the week, Jen. Pity you only get to enjoy it once in a blue moon.

      Hopefully I can still get together with people (other freelancers, perhaps?) to drink and talk crap once I’m freelancing. Actually, it would be great if they were freelancers, because then I wouldn’t mind a bit if they started talking shop.

      Reply
  • Jen Frahm January 30, 2010, 7:47 pm

    Oh I hear you, I hear you. SO many things I don’t miss, but you know what? Focusing on them didn’t get me to the emacipation very quickly. Would love to see your next post on the 6 things you are totally gagging for. You may not have to work as slowly. Due paying can be accelerated — keen to watch and celebrate.

    Reply
    • Bill Harper January 30, 2010, 10:32 pm

      It might not be the next post, but I will certainly list the things I’m “totally gagging for” soon. Thanks for the comment, the encouragement, and the idea for a future blog post.

      Reply
  • Rebecca Leigh January 30, 2010, 9:46 pm

    Oh yes, skipping the whole peak hour public transport (and driving) torture is AWESOME!

    I remember when, after about 6 months of freedom, I made the mistake of scheduling a city appointment one morning.

    I had forgotten what it was like… but that train trip (hot day, trains running late, standing room barely) was enough to make me swear off all meetings that required me to travel in peak hour. And because I’m my own boss, I get to make that call (:

    Reply
    • Bill Harper January 30, 2010, 10:45 pm

      The trip into work isn’t too bad (or maybe I’m still asleep and don’t notice how bad it is).

      But the trip home is torture. The trains have already been through Central station, so they’re packed before they even pull up. Forget standing room only, there’s barely even breathing room in there.

      And let’s not even go into whether the air-conditioning is actually working.

      Here’s to no more peak-hour travelling.

      Reply

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